The Online Resource for Massachusetts Poverty Law Advocates

Lift the Cap on Kids

Date: 
05/01/2017
Author: 
MLRI

Repeal the Welfare Family Cap!

Ask your legislator to co-sponsor and support bills to repeal the welfare family cap.

The Senate bill (lead sponsor Senator DiDomenico) is S.34 The House bill (lead sponsor Representative Decker) is H.85.

Representatives and Senators can still sign onto the Senate bill, S.34  Members can no longer sign onto the House bill. 

See attached fact sheet with list of supporting organizations on the second page.

Find your legislator here

What is the Cap on Kids?

The Cap on Kids – also called the Family Cap – denies welfare benefits to children conceived while – or soon after – the family received benefits.

Massachusetts denies benefits to 9,000 children because of the Cap on Kids.

What is the impact of the Cap on Kids?

  • The Cap on Kids causes everyone in the family to suffer – including the excluded child’s older siblings.
  • Welfare benefits are very low – $578/month for a family of three, but only $478 if one of the children is excluded by the Cap on Kids. Welfare benefits go up by about $100 a month as family size increases.

 “[Family cap] children are undernourished not because of acts of God, but acts of legislation.  Malnourished children increase health costs in the short term and jeopardize Massachusetts’s future work force in the long term.” Deborah A. Frank, MD, Director, Grow Clinic for Children, Boston Medical Center

See "Why Pediatricians Urge Family Cap Repeal," Children's Health Watch. 

  • The Cap on Kids does not reduce births to mothers on welfare. Welfare families on average are the same size as families in the general population.

  “I don’t know a woman – and I don’t think she exists – who would have a baby for the sole purpose of having another [$100] a month.” State Senator Holly Mitchell (D. CA), successfully advocated for 2016 CA repeal

Massachusetts is one of only 17 states that still have a Cap on Kids or similar policy. 

Seven states that had kids cap policies have repealed them. See map

We can afford to lift the Cap on Kids. 

Massachusetts’s spending for TAFDC is less than 20% of what it was in 1995 when the Cap on Kids was enacted. The "savings" from the drop in the caseload can be used to lift the Cap. See charts here.

Please Support the Campaign to Lift the Cap on Kids -- Value All Children Equally

68 Representatives have signed onto the House bill and /or the Senate bill (click "Print Preview" to see the list of signers). Fourteen Senators have signed onto the Senate bill.

Please Help Our Most Vulnerable Kids.  

Ask your legislator to urge the Chairs of House and Senate Ways and Means and the Speaker and the Senate President to include provisions in the budget for the coming year that --

  • Protect children with a severely disabled parent
  • Lift the Cap on Kids

Fact sheet attached here

See Press on the Campaign to Lift the Cap on Kids

State House News Service article featuring Lift the Cap on Kids at the  Social Worker Lobby Day at the State House on March 21, 2017

Springfield Republican article featuring Lift the Cap on Kids at Women's Bar Association Legislative Breakfast on February 7 2017

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For more information, please contact:  Deborah Harris, Mass. Law Reform Institute, dharris@mlri.org, 617-357-0700 x 313, or Naomi Meyer, Greater Boston Legal Services, nmeyer@gbls.org, 617-603-1621.

 


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