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Winner Of $3M Breakthrough Prize Calls For Defense Of Science 'When Winds Blow Against' It

CommonHealth (WBUR) - 3 hours 49 min ago
"When the winds blow against science, it’s all of our responsibilities to defend science and promote fact-based reasoning and rationality," Stephen J. Elledge said in accepting the Breakthrough Prize. "I ask each of you to rise up to meet that challenge."
Categories: Health Care

To Repeat: Medicare Isn’t Going “Bankrupt”

House Speaker Paul Ryan is repeating a myth that we and others have debunked before:  that Medicare is running out of money.  “Medicare goes bankrupt in about 10 years,” he said on CBS’ “60 Minutes,” adding that “for the X-Generation on down, it won’t be there for us on its current path.”  That’s just not true.

Categories: Benefits, Poverty

“Better Way” Plan Shows GOP Tax Priorities Emphasize the Wealthy

House Speaker Paul Ryan says he can’t yet provide details on how a Republican tax-cut bill would affect middle-class and wealthy households.  When, in a CBS “60 Minutes” interview last night, Scott Pelley asked about the dollar amount of the middle-class tax cut, Ryan replied:  “When I have a bill, I’ll tell you the number.”

Categories: Benefits, Poverty

The Ali-Frazier Fight Of Biotech? Patent Court To Hear CRISPR Oral Arguments

CommonHealth (WBUR) - 7 hours 55 min ago
A patent litigation expert says the battle royale over CRISPR -- the revolutionary gene-editing technology coming before a federal patent court this week -- could take years.
Categories: Health Care

Insurers’ Flawed Directories Leave Patients Scrambling For In-Network Doctors

Kaiser Health News - 8 hours 25 min ago

Penny Gentieu did not intend to phone 308 physicians in six different insurance plans when she started shopping for 2017 health coverage.

But a few calls suggested to Gentieu, a photographer who lives in Toledo, Ohio, that doctors listed as “taking new patients” in the health plans’ directories were not necessarily doing so.

Surprised that information about something so central to health insurance could be so poor, she contacted almost every primary care physician listed as accepting new patients in every local plan. More than three-quarters of those doctors in her part of Ohio were in fact rejecting new patients, she found.

“It’s just not fair to be baited and switched,” said Gentieu, who must find a new doctor because her physician of several years will not be in any available plans in her area next year. “It’s just so crazy that you’re presented with this big list of doctors and then you call them and you realize there’s nobody there.”

This KHN story also ran in The New York Times. It can be republished for free (details).

As consumers review their coverage and shop for 2017 insurance through the federal health law’s online marketplaces during the annual open enrollment period, many of the directories they are using are outdated and inaccurate. Some doctors in the directories are not accepting new patients and some are not participating in the network, say experts, brokers and consumers. Still other physicians in the directories, who are listed as “in-plan,” charge patients thousands of dollars extra per year in “concierge fees” to join their practices.

“There continue to be inaccuracy problems,” said Justin Giovannelli, a Georgetown University professor, who studies coverage under the health law. Flawed directories are “a real barrier to accessing the care and accessing the insurance consumers have purchased.”

President-elect Donald Trump has pledged to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, which created the marketplaces. But insurers’ doctor lists are likely to remain a problem no matter what the law looks like, consumer advocates say.

Knowing which doctors and specialists are available within a plan is critical, as patients who visit a physician outside a plan’s network must pay much if not all of the cost.

The effect from flawed directories is even greater this year, as carriers have stopped offering coverage in many markets, meaning many consumers have only one or two insurers to choose from. The number of doctors and hospitals in plan networks also continues to shrink as insurers steer patients toward lower-cost narrow networks.

Reports of inaccuracies suggest that new federal rules to ensure reliable directories are having little effect. Starting this year, all plans sold through the marketplaces are required to “publish an up-to-date, accurate and complete provider directory” or be subject to penalties or removed from the marketplace portal.

But so far no plans have been fined or kicked off the enrollment sites for having poor doctor directories, said Aaron Albright, a spokesman for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which would enforce the rules. A Health and Human Services Department survey of Medicare plans for those 65 and older that was released in October found errors in nearly half of the listings in doctor directories.

Staci Doolin, a co-owner of a radon-testing company in Forsyth, Ill., consulted the Blue Cross Blue Shield of Illinois physician directory in January to make sure her primary care physician was in the network and even called the insurer to double-check.

The directory was wrong. The doctor was not in the plan.

“I thought I was good to go, and then I get this bill and it says my insurance didn’t cover anything and I owe $503,” Doolin said.

It took until September to resolve the matter — but not before the office threatened to summon a bill collector. She never recovered $100 she spent on a dermatologist who was listed in the directory but who also was not part of the plan.

No comprehensive data exists on doctor directory accuracy. The health law and HHS set standards for network adequacy but leave most enforcement up to states. States rarely test the lists for accuracy and often rely on consumers to report problems.

But third-party surveys frequently reveal big discrepancies. One recently published study showed as many as a fourth of the doctors listed in California directories last year for marketplace plans were not accepting new patients. About one doctor in 10 was not working for the listed practice.

Consumer advocates often praise California for vigorous insurance regulation. Last year, the state fined one plan $350,000 and another $250,000 for flawed doctor directories.

“I have to think it’s pretty much the same nationwide,” said Simon Haeder, an assistant professor at West Virginia University, who led the study. “Insurers have a hard time keeping these up-to-date because it costs a lot of money, and providers don’t put a lot of effort on giving insurers updated information.”

Even doctors offices are frequently unclear about whether they participate in certain plans, said insurance brokers, who assist consumers shopping for plans.

Confusion multiplies when physicians are in some networks and not others offered by the same insurer. Doctors might be part of broader plan with many choices but not part of a narrow network with nearly the same name.

“We’d have customers call up [a doctor] and they’d say, ‘We take Blue Cross PPO,’” said John Jaggi, an Illinois broker. “But they didn’t take Blue Choice Preferred PPO.” Neither the patient nor the doctor’s office knew the difference, he said.

Even when primary-care doctors are in-network and accepting new patients, they increasingly charge expensive “concierge” fees on top of the usual deductibles, co-pays and premiums required by the policy, brokers say.

The primary-care roster for two plans from Florida Blue, the Blue Cross insurer in that state, lists four physicians working for NCH Healthcare, a Naples hospital system. One practiced at Harvard University and another worked for the Cincinnati Bengals football team.

What the directory doesn’t say is that seeing those four doctors costs patients an extra $3,000 a year in addition to thousands of dollars in premiums and deductibles.

Florida Blue cannot discuss contracts with network doctors and is unaware of recent complaints about concierge fees, said company spokesman Paul Kluding.

Directories for specialty physicians may be even more difficult to navigate than those for primary care doctors.

Brian Jarvis, who lives near Dayton, Ohio, needed an orthopedist after straining an Achilles’ tendon this summer. He had to go through 17 doctors listed as accepting his marketplace plan before finding one who really did, he said.

An online tool for Florida Blue does not let consumers search for anesthesiologists, who are often outside coverage networks even when their hospital is in network. Unwittingly being put under by a non-network anesthesiologist can cost patients thousands of dollars.

Even insurers admit patients are ultimately on their own to navigate the directory thicket.

“We recommend you contact the provider to confirm that they are in your plan and that the desired service is covered,” warns the online doctor-search tool for Anthem, one of the biggest sellers of marketplace plans under the health law.

Few consumers take that advice to heart like Gentieu.

“I was shocked at how awful the state of Ohio is for handling all of this,” said Gentieu, who was concerned about having a five-year-old hip replacement monitored.

She posted results on her website and sent complaint letters to plans and the Ohio Department of Insurance. Four of the insurers did not substantially dispute Gentieu’s research.

“While our findings do not exactly match those of Gentieu, we did identify issues which are being addressed,” said Don Olson, a spokesman for Medical Mutual of Ohio, a health insurer in the state.

Gentieu found that only 15 percent of those listed as primary care doctors in one Medical Mutual network were actually primary care physicians taking new patients. Many had not accepted new patients in years. Others were specialty doctors, nurse practitioners or medical residents who had not completed their training.

Physicians often fail to tell insurers when they stop accepting patients for certain plans, Medical Mutual and other carriers said.

Like HHS, Ohio instituted new directory-accuracy rules this year for marketplace plans. But enforcing them is “consumer-driven,” said David Hopcraft, a spokesman for the Ohio Insurance Department. The state does not check the lists until consumers report inaccuracies, one doctor at a time.

“That is completely insufficient,” said Lynn Quincy, a health care specialist for Consumers Union. “Only 13 percent of the non-elderly adult population know they have a state insurance department, so clearly that’s a pretty bad setup.”

Categories: Health Care

Commentary: GOP’s Health Reform Strategy Amounts to Repeal Without Replacement

Republican congressional leaders plan to move quickly in January to repeal the bulk of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) without enacting a replacement plan to prevent the millions of people who have gained coverage through the ACA from becoming uninsured. 

Categories: Benefits, Poverty

The Law Library Blog, In Custodia Legis, Named to ABA Journal’s Blawg 100 for Third Time

In Custodia Legis - 11 hours 10 min ago

We are excited that once again In Custodia Legis has been recognized as one of the top 100 best blogs for a legal audience out of more than 4,000 in the ABA Journal’s Blawg Directory.  We were first included in the ABA Journal’s 8th Annual Blawg 100 in 2014.  Then we were fortunate to be listed again in the 9th Annual Blawg 100 in 2015 and this year makes for the third year in a row!

Back in August 2010, we started In Custodia Legis with a goal of opening up the Law Library of Congress. We wanted to share the wide range of projects, services, events, and talented staff.  Our original blog team of five has grown over the years as we work to provide insight into all areas of the Law Library of Congress.

I am fortunate to be a part of a great team of bloggers, which includes:

In Custodia Legis is edited by Kimberly Allen.  In addition, we have a wide variety of people who contribute with more than 300 guest posts and 200 interviews.

I enjoyed reading the comment by Theodore Defosse (a fellow legislative branch employee) about In Custodia Legis on the Blawg 100.  He said it “[t]ends to motivate you to learn more about a specific subject—and to use one’s reader card more often at Library of Congress.”

What do you think about In Custodia Legis? Share your comments below.

If you don’t receive alerts from our daily posts, take a minute to subscribe to In Custodia Legis by email or RSS.  You can also learn about new posts via Twitter or Facebook.

Categories: Research & Litigation

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